BIOL398-01/S11:Class Journal Week 14

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(Alondra Vega's Journal Entry: added my journal entry and my signature)
(Reflection)
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===Reflection===
===Reflection===
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Reflect back on your learning for this project and for the entire semester and answer the following:
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# What is the value of combining biological and mathematical approaches to scientific questions?
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# Looking back on your reflections on the Janovy and Steward readings from the [[BIOL398-01/S11:Class Journal Week 1 | Week 1 Class Journal]], do you have any further insights to share?  Have your answers changed to those original reflection questions?  Why or why not?
== Class Responses ==  
== Class Responses ==  

Revision as of 12:14, 25 April 2011

Contents

Instructions

Formatting

  • Link to your journal entry from your user page.
  • Link back from the journal entry to your user page.
  • Sign your portion of the journal with the standard wiki signature shortcut (~~~~).
  • Add the "BIOL398-01/S11" category to the end of the wiki page (if someone has not already done so).

Reflection

Reflect back on your learning for this project and for the entire semester and answer the following:

  1. What is the value of combining biological and mathematical approaches to scientific questions?
  2. Looking back on your reflections on the Janovy and Steward readings from the Week 1 Class Journal, do you have any further insights to share? Have your answers changed to those original reflection questions? Why or why not?

Class Responses

Sarah Carratt's Journal Entry

Carmen E. Castaneda's Journal Entry

James C. Clements' Journal Entry

Nicholas A. Rohacz's Journal Entry

Alondra Vega's Journal Entry

  1. I think that it is important to combine mathematical and biological approaches to answer scientific questions because it is a different method that opens door to answer questions that would not have been answered before. For example, using mathematics future predictions can be made and a trend can be followed. This helps look at questions that were unthinkable before, such as how does the cell behave. I feel that the way that we are looking at cold shock is one of the best ways. We can confirm with mathematics what is seen in the lab. Combining two subjects also gives these questions different perspectives. A mathematician and biologist may end up with the same answer to a question, but will have different evidence and it will give more validity to the experiment.
  2. I'm not sure if my opinions have changed. I feel that anyone who is able to practice mathematics and enjoy the beauty of mathematics and how it brings things together is more than capable in being a mathematician. Some people say that a person who uses math equations is not a mathematician and I agree, what makes this person a mathematician is the fact that they are able to see the art of the numbers come together and why it works. I feel the same way I felt towards biology as I did after the reading. A person who is able to be fascinated about the puzzle of life and is willing to try to discover it is a biologist. Working on this project has shown me that I act both as a mathematician and as a biologist. we are trying to discover what happens in a small place in the cell, the smallest unit of life, which is pretty exciting. Using math to do this will bring all the pieces together. The best part will be when a final conclusion is made with both biology and math because that is when the puzzle will be complete. Having a passion for what you do and for what you study makes you whatever it is you are dedicated in. Just because you are good at something does not mean that is what you are. It is the passion and drive that keeps you in the field.

Alondra Vega 22:56, 24 April 2011 (EDT)

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