Biomod/2013/North Carolina State University/Goals/

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<p style="text-align:center;"> The DNAbeans hope to bring the properties of the nanoscale up to the micro and macro length scales.  We want to show that it is possible to design for the macroscale with nanoscale particles.  Specifically we hope to capture the unique optical properties attributed to gold nanorods and quantum dots.  To achieve this we are creating nanoscale arrays within an electrospun photoresist polymer. Once created this array can be used in optical circuit connections.  Ideally it will allow one to phase change light, reliably stepping the light down from a high frequency to a lower frequency.  </p>
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<p style="text-align:center;font-size:13pt;"> The DNAbeans hope to bring the properties of the nanoscale up to the micro and macro length scales.  We want to show that it is possible to design for the macroscale with nanoscale particles.  Specifically we hope to capture the unique optical properties attributed to gold nanorods and quantum dots.  To achieve this we are creating nanoscale arrays within an electrospun photoresist polymer. Once created this array can be used in optical circuit connections.  Ideally it will allow one to phase change light, reliably stepping the light down from a high frequency to a lower frequency.  </p>
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<p style="text-align: center;"> Ultimately we hop that this project will inspire other researchers into creating similar methods to design macroscale components with known nanoscale structures.  An example may be in the construction of transistors.  Perhaps you need to achieve an exact ratio of silicon to phosphorous in order to get the sensitivity you need.  In order to reach that ratio you will need to control diffusion and the silicon array at the nanoscale level.  A daunting prospect to say the least.  It would be much easier if the silicon phosphorous array could be assembled at once through a process similar to our own. </p>
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<p style="text-align: center;font-size:13pt"> Ultimately we hop that this project will inspire other researchers into creating similar methods to design macroscale components with known nanoscale structures.  An example may be in the construction of transistors.  Perhaps you need to achieve an exact ratio of silicon to phosphorous in order to get the sensitivity you need.  In order to reach that ratio you will need to control diffusion and the silicon array at the nanoscale level.  A daunting prospect to say the least.  It would be much easier if the silicon phosphorous array could be assembled at once through a process similar to our own. </p>
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<p style="text-align: center;"> This is the goal of Team DNAbeans.  To design and construct macroscale components to solve engineering challenges with property specific nanoscale arrays.  Engineering from the bottom up. </p>  
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<p style="text-align: center;font-size:13pt"> This is the goal of Team DNAbeans.  To design and construct macroscale components to solve engineering challenges with property specific nanoscale arrays.  Engineering from the bottom up. </p>  
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Goals of Team DNAbeans

The DNAbeans hope to bring the properties of the nanoscale up to the micro and macro length scales. We want to show that it is possible to design for the macroscale with nanoscale particles. Specifically we hope to capture the unique optical properties attributed to gold nanorods and quantum dots. To achieve this we are creating nanoscale arrays within an electrospun photoresist polymer. Once created this array can be used in optical circuit connections. Ideally it will allow one to phase change light, reliably stepping the light down from a high frequency to a lower frequency.

Ultimately we hop that this project will inspire other researchers into creating similar methods to design macroscale components with known nanoscale structures. An example may be in the construction of transistors. Perhaps you need to achieve an exact ratio of silicon to phosphorous in order to get the sensitivity you need. In order to reach that ratio you will need to control diffusion and the silicon array at the nanoscale level. A daunting prospect to say the least. It would be much easier if the silicon phosphorous array could be assembled at once through a process similar to our own.

This is the goal of Team DNAbeans. To design and construct macroscale components to solve engineering challenges with property specific nanoscale arrays. Engineering from the bottom up.

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