CHE.496/2008/Responses/a4

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*'''[[User:Patrick Gildea|Patrick Gildea]] 09:22, 27 January 2008 (CST)''':
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*Kevin Hershey Response
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**Idempotent Vector Design for Standard Assembly of Biobricks
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***This articles primary purpose is to illustrate the design components of the biobricks. It begins by discussing the aspect of standardization using the analogy of a screw, where standardizing the thread of a screw helped the industry tremendously. The article then gets to the meat of the topic, discussing the design of biobricks. The most important design is the location of the restriction enzymes. The standard format is as follows: Eco RI, Xba 1, insert, Spe 1, Pst 1. This allows users to 'plug and play' devices into the biobrick as long as they keep the sequences standard. The advantage to this format is that if an insert is added to an existing biobrick, it cannot be broken again. In other words, if the Eco RI and Xba 1 are chosen to be ligated, the sequence is lost, and the biobrick does not have a risk of being fragmented after it has been constructed.
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**Genetic parts to program bacteria
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***In this article, Christopher Voigt discusses the engineering currently being done in synthetic biology. That is to say, some examples of how synthetic biology is currently being used and created. His figure showing the different switches and sensors is very useful, especially as a precursor to using the Standardized Registry of Biological Parts. Voigt then goes into detail of different two component systems, sensors and inputs, genetic circuits, and actuators. Voigt then goes into detail on debugging and tuning. The main point from this article is the ability of synthetic biologists to build complex systems from their standardized parts.
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*'''[[User:KPHershey]] 12:01, 27 January 2008 (EST)'''
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*'''[[User:Patrick Gildea|Patrick Gildea]] 09:22, 27 January 2008 (CST)''':
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Revision as of 13:02, 27 January 2008

Responses Page:


Genetic Programming

Image:TestFile.doc


  • Kevin Hershey Response
    • Idempotent Vector Design for Standard Assembly of Biobricks
      • This articles primary purpose is to illustrate the design components of the biobricks. It begins by discussing the aspect of standardization using the analogy of a screw, where standardizing the thread of a screw helped the industry tremendously. The article then gets to the meat of the topic, discussing the design of biobricks. The most important design is the location of the restriction enzymes. The standard format is as follows: Eco RI, Xba 1, insert, Spe 1, Pst 1. This allows users to 'plug and play' devices into the biobrick as long as they keep the sequences standard. The advantage to this format is that if an insert is added to an existing biobrick, it cannot be broken again. In other words, if the Eco RI and Xba 1 are chosen to be ligated, the sequence is lost, and the biobrick does not have a risk of being fragmented after it has been constructed.
    • Genetic parts to program bacteria
      • In this article, Christopher Voigt discusses the engineering currently being done in synthetic biology. That is to say, some examples of how synthetic biology is currently being used and created. His figure showing the different switches and sensors is very useful, especially as a precursor to using the Standardized Registry of Biological Parts. Voigt then goes into detail of different two component systems, sensors and inputs, genetic circuits, and actuators. Voigt then goes into detail on debugging and tuning. The main point from this article is the ability of synthetic biologists to build complex systems from their standardized parts.
  • User:KPHershey 12:01, 27 January 2008 (EST)
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