Crisanti:Positions

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For more information on available positions please contact [mailto:l.collyns@imperial.ac.uk Mrs Lucy Collyns]
For more information on available positions please contact [mailto:l.collyns@imperial.ac.uk Mrs Lucy Collyns]
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'''PhD Studentship''' ''Immediately Available'' <br>
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'''Acceleration of ageing in Anopheles mosquitoes'''
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Anopheles mosquitoes are the sole vectors of the malaria parasite and as such are responsible for over a million childhood deaths every year.  The malaria parasite is acquired when the female mosquito takes a blood meal from an infected human host.  It then requires a period of 10 to 14 days to replicate and disseminate before the mosquito is infective to humans.  This incubation period represents a significant proportion of the natural life span of adult mosquitoes and hence control interventions that specifically target older female mosquitoes will be more efficient at reducing malaria transmission than generic strategies targeting all ages. 
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In this project, funded by the Grand Challenges in Global Health, we will investigate the ageing process in Anopheles mosquitoes and identify specific pathways whose perturbation reduces the mosquito lifespan.  Targeted disruption of genes controlling key steps in these pathways will be used to investigate the feasibility of driving premature ageing through the population.
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Students with a 2:1 BSc (or equivalent), a background in genetics and an interest in molecular entomology are encouraged to send their CV and a cover letter outlining their reasons for applying to Professor Crisanti. The studentship is available immediately although students graduating this year are also welcome to apply. The Crisanti laboratory is based in the Sir Alexander Fleming Building in South Kensington, which offers the very latest facilities for mosquito maintenance and research and has six internationally recognized groups of researchers investigating aspects of malaria transmission.
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Closing Date for Applications:  '''27th April 2007'''

Revision as of 12:25, 22 March 2007

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For more information on available positions please contact Mrs Lucy Collyns



PhD Studentship Immediately Available
Acceleration of ageing in Anopheles mosquitoes

Anopheles mosquitoes are the sole vectors of the malaria parasite and as such are responsible for over a million childhood deaths every year. The malaria parasite is acquired when the female mosquito takes a blood meal from an infected human host. It then requires a period of 10 to 14 days to replicate and disseminate before the mosquito is infective to humans. This incubation period represents a significant proportion of the natural life span of adult mosquitoes and hence control interventions that specifically target older female mosquitoes will be more efficient at reducing malaria transmission than generic strategies targeting all ages.

In this project, funded by the Grand Challenges in Global Health, we will investigate the ageing process in Anopheles mosquitoes and identify specific pathways whose perturbation reduces the mosquito lifespan. Targeted disruption of genes controlling key steps in these pathways will be used to investigate the feasibility of driving premature ageing through the population.

Students with a 2:1 BSc (or equivalent), a background in genetics and an interest in molecular entomology are encouraged to send their CV and a cover letter outlining their reasons for applying to Professor Crisanti. The studentship is available immediately although students graduating this year are also welcome to apply. The Crisanti laboratory is based in the Sir Alexander Fleming Building in South Kensington, which offers the very latest facilities for mosquito maintenance and research and has six internationally recognized groups of researchers investigating aspects of malaria transmission.

Closing Date for Applications: 27th April 2007

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