Hartings AU Photosynthesis Lab

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(New page: {{Template:Hartings AU Phosphorylation Lab}} <div style="margin-left: 40px; width: 750px"> We are synthesizing novel ruthenium-modified adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogues. These molecu...)
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We are synthesizing novel ruthenium-modified adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogues. These molecules are being designed so that they can be used by kinases to phosphorylate protein-substrates with a ruthenium-modified phosphate group. Additionally, the ruthenated-phosphate group must be inaccessible to phosphatases such that once the protein-substrate is irreversibly phosphorylated. We plan to use these molecules to study and disrupt intracellular communication with a specific focus on cancerous cells. (The image above shows that one of the ruthenium-modified ATP molecules will look like (left) as well as a rendering of a protein structure with a tyrosine that has been phosphorylated with our modified ATP (right)). You can find more information on this lab at our group [http://hartingslab.com/research/phosphorylation website].<br>
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We are modifying hemoglobin, a common protein responsible for the red color in blood, so that is capable of converting carbon dioxide into more useful chemicals. Transforming hemoglobin will, initially, involve two basic steps. First, the heme molecule that gives hemoglobin many of its characteristics will be replaced with one of several similar molecules in order to make the reactivity of the modified-hemoglobin match up with the reactivity of CO2. Second, light-sensitive molecules will be attached to the surface of the protein. These molecules, upon absorbing light, will help to provide the energy that the CO2 reactions require. You can find more information on this lab at our group [http://hartingslab.com/research/photosynthesis website].<br>
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<div style="text-align: center;">[[Image:Hartings_Kinase_phosphatase_s.png|450px]]</div><br>
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<div style="text-align: center;">[[Image:Hartings_Phosphorylation_CO2reduction.tif|450px]]</div><br>
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We are modifying hemoglobin, a common protein responsible for the red color in blood, so that is capable of converting carbon dioxide into more useful chemicals. Transforming hemoglobin will, initially, involve two basic steps. First, the heme molecule that gives hemoglobin many of its characteristics will be replaced with one of several similar molecules in order to make the reactivity of the modified-hemoglobin match up with the reactivity of CO2. Second, light-sensitive molecules will be attached to the surface of the protein. These molecules, upon absorbing light, will help to provide the energy that the CO2 reactions require. You can find more information on this lab at our group website.


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