Jewett Lab

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<h3><font style="color:#F8B603;">Research</font></h3>
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<h3><font style="color:#F8B603;">Lab Focus</font></h3>
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How do organisms adapt to different environments?  We are interested in understanding the genetic and molecular changes that take place as organisms adapt to different environments.   Which genes change, what types of genetic changes occur, and how do these changes affect the organism at the biochemical, physiological, and ecological levels?
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Our research aims to engineer biological systems for compelling applications in medicine and biotechnology.  We focus on cell-free systems, with particular emphasis on protein synthesis and metabolism.  Engineering cell-free systems both tests our understanding of how life works and generates useful, cost-effective factories for manufacturing human therapeutics and valuable biochemicals that are difficult to make in vivo.  Our approach is to integrate fundamental research and engineering design principles with technology development.
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Our interdisciplinary efforts take advantage of synergies at the crossroads of biological and engineering science.  They represent a bottom-up approach to synthetic biology.  The key idea is that design and construction of biological systems will become easier and more reliable if we can develop foundational technologies that partition biology into simple modular pieces that we can directly manipulate and control.  To this end, it is desirable to reduce the complexity of existing biological systems and remove unnecessary overhead (e.g. unnecessary genes and evolutionary baggage).  Cell-free systems, which are decoupled from the genetic architecture of the cell, offer a unique platform to address this need.  They reduce complexity, lack structural boundaries, are free from cell viability constraints, and can direct catalytic resources towards a single objective.  As a result, cell-free systems promise to catalyze a new paradigm for studying, tuning, and controlling life. 
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Since plants are rooted in their environment, they are particularly adept at coping with their environment.   Furthermore different species, and populations within species, have adapted to different environments.   Therefore plants are well suited for studying adaptation mechanisms.
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[[Jewett_Lab:Research | read more...]]
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Because light is fundamental to plant growth, we have focused on how plants sense and respond to environmental light cues.  We are focused on light perception by the phytochrome photoreceptors.  Phytochromes sense red and far-red light and provide information about the density of neighboring foliage (among other things).
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<h3><font style="color:#C9D3EB;">Graduate Students</font></h3>
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We work on ''Arabidopsis thaliana'' and related species and use a combination of molecular genetic, quantitative genetic, and molecular evolution techniques.  Please see [http://www.naturalvariation.org naturalvariation.org] for information about some of our collaborators who are taking similar approaches.
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Andrea Engel|Andrea Engel]]
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Brian Fritz|Brian Fritz]]
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Rue Gan|Rue Gan]]
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Eric Hodgman|Eric Hodgman]]
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Laura Timmerman|Laura Timmerman]]
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Eric Tseng|Eric Tseng]]
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[[Jewett_Lab:Research | read more...]]
 
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<h3><font style="color:#C9D3EB;">Lab Members</font></h3>
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<h3><font style="color:#C9D3EB;">Post Doctorates</font></h3>
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Ann Bunner|Ann Bunner]]
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Rue Gan|Rue Gan]]
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Julin_Jewett|Julin Jewett]]
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<h3><font style="color:#C9D3EB;">Undergraduates</font></h3>
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Daniele_Filiault|Daniele Filiault]]
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Ethan Altman|Ethan Altman]]
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Jose_M._Jimenez-Gomez|Jose M Jimenez-Gomez]]
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Diana Lorenzini|Diana Lorenzini]]
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*[[user:Patricia_Mueller-Moule|Patricia Mueller-Moule]]
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Amanda_Schrager|Amanda Schrager]]
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*[[Jewett_Lab:Danelle_Seymour|Danelle Seymour]]
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*[[Jewett_Lab:An_Tat|An Tat]]
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<h3><font style="color:#C9D3EB;">Former Members</font></h3>
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*[[Maloof_Lab:Kazunari_Nozue|Kazunari Nozue]]
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*[[Maloof_Lab:Matthew Schultz|Matthew Schultz]]
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*[[Maloof_Lab:Jose Solis|Jose Solis]]
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*[http://www.bio.indiana.edu/facultyresearch/faculty/Moyle.html Leonie Moyle]
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*Andrea Wills
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*[http://upg.duke.edu/studentlife/wessinger.html Carrie Wessinger]
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*[[Maloof_Lab:Melissa_Pytlak|Melissa Pytlak]]
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*[[Maloof_Lab:Celia_Futch|Celia Futch]]
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*[[Maloof_Lab:Ana_Mitchell|Ana Mitchell]]
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*[[Maloof_Lab:Andii_Wallace|Andii Wallace]]
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<h3><font style="color:#C9D3EB;">Publications</font></h3>  
<h3><font style="color:#C9D3EB;">Publications</font></h3>  
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*Jiménez-Gómez JM, & Maloof JN (2009) Plant research accelerates along the (bio)informatics superhighway: symposium on plant sensing, response and adaptation to the environment. [http://www.nature.com/embor/journal/v10/n6/full/embor2009116.html EMBO Rep 10: 568-72].
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*Jewett, M.C., Calhoun, K.A., Voloshin, A., Wuu, J.J., and Swartz, J.R. 2008. An integrated cell-free metabolic platform for protein production and synthetic biology. Molecular Systems Biology. 4:220.
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*Jimenez-Gomez JM, & Maloof JN (2009) Sequence diversity in three tomato species: SNPs, markers, and molecular evolution. [http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2229/9/85 BMC Plant Biol 9: 85].
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*Filiault DL, Wessinger CA, Dinneny JR, Lutes J, Borevitz JO, Weigel D, Chory J and Maloof JN. (2008) Amino acid polymorphisms in Arabidopsis phytochrome B cause differential responses to light. [http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/105/8/3157 PNAS 105, 3157-3162].
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*Nozue K, Covington MF, Duek PD, Lorrain S, Fankhauser C, Harmer SL, Maloof JN. (2007) Rhythmic growth explained by coincidence between internal and external cues. [http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v448/n7151/abs/nature05946.html Nature 448, 358-361].
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*Pizarro, F.J. †, Jewett, M.C.†, Nielsen, J., and Agosin, E.  2008. Physiological and transcriptional mapping of evolutionary differences between commercial and laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. Appl. Environ. Microbiol.74: 6358-6368.
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*Fazio, A.†, Jewett, M.C.†, Daran-Lapujade, P., Mustacchi, R., Usaite, R., Pronk, J.T., Workman, C.T., and Nielsen, J.  2008. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a three factor design. BMC Genomics. 9:341.
*[[Maloof_Lab:Publications | see complete list...]]
*[[Maloof_Lab:Publications | see complete list...]]

Revision as of 12:36, 12 April 2010

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Lab Focus

Our research aims to engineer biological systems for compelling applications in medicine and biotechnology. We focus on cell-free systems, with particular emphasis on protein synthesis and metabolism. Engineering cell-free systems both tests our understanding of how life works and generates useful, cost-effective factories for manufacturing human therapeutics and valuable biochemicals that are difficult to make in vivo. Our approach is to integrate fundamental research and engineering design principles with technology development. Our interdisciplinary efforts take advantage of synergies at the crossroads of biological and engineering science. They represent a bottom-up approach to synthetic biology. The key idea is that design and construction of biological systems will become easier and more reliable if we can develop foundational technologies that partition biology into simple modular pieces that we can directly manipulate and control. To this end, it is desirable to reduce the complexity of existing biological systems and remove unnecessary overhead (e.g. unnecessary genes and evolutionary baggage). Cell-free systems, which are decoupled from the genetic architecture of the cell, offer a unique platform to address this need. They reduce complexity, lack structural boundaries, are free from cell viability constraints, and can direct catalytic resources towards a single objective. As a result, cell-free systems promise to catalyze a new paradigm for studying, tuning, and controlling life.

read more...

Graduate Students


Post Doctorates

Undergraduates

Publications

  • Jewett, M.C., Calhoun, K.A., Voloshin, A., Wuu, J.J., and Swartz, J.R. 2008. An integrated cell-free metabolic platform for protein production and synthetic biology. Molecular Systems Biology. 4:220.
  • Pizarro, F.J. †, Jewett, M.C.†, Nielsen, J., and Agosin, E. 2008. Physiological and transcriptional mapping of evolutionary differences between commercial and laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. Appl. Environ. Microbiol.74: 6358-6368.
  • Fazio, A.†, Jewett, M.C.†, Daran-Lapujade, P., Mustacchi, R., Usaite, R., Pronk, J.T., Workman, C.T., and Nielsen, J. 2008. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a three factor design. BMC Genomics. 9:341.
  • see complete list...

Announcements

Funding

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