Lauffenburger:Collaborators

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Lauffenburger Lab

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Linda Griffith's laboratory (MIT) attempts to understand and control cell interactions with surfaces with a focus on applications in tissue engineering and cell culture. Projects encompass two complementary areas: synthesis and modification of polymeric materials, and characterization of cell and tissue responses to materials.




Rick Horwitz's laboratory (University of Virginia) is actively investigating many aspects of the structure and function of integrin molecules and the processes they mediate. Recent progress includes elucidation of the roles of several different integrins during (muscle) differentiation.





Roger Kamm's research (M.I.T.) includes biomedical fluid dynamics such as repiratory mechanics, ocular fluid dynamics and transport, and cardiovascular fluid dynamics. Models of normal and pathologic conditions are used to elucidate mechanical phenomena.





Peter So's research (M.I.T.) includes topics such as fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy instrumentations, deep tissue imaging, functional imaging of cellular systems, single protein dynamics, and bio-micromechanics.




Bruce Tidor







Peter Sorger






Alan Wells's laboratory (UPitt) researches growth factor receptor-mediated cell locomotion and its consequences in physiologic and pathologic situations. The laboratory is investigating motility signaling from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as our model system.






Steve Wiley's research interests have focused on understanding mechanisms of cell communication and signaling using the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) system as a model. He pioneered methods for the quantitative analysis of receptor dynamics in mammalian cells and published some of the first computer models of receptor regulation. He has been a major contributor to the field of receptor research, particularly with regard to the control of receptor distribution within cells.




Michael Yaffe (MIT)






Leona Samson (MIT)








David Schauer (MIT)





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