Making scientific posters

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'''Poster Goals'''
'''Poster Goals'''
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Posters can used in different settings.  For example, you might design a poster to be a stand-alone "self-extracting archive" that stands unattended in the hallway of the biology building.  Somebody who knows nothing about what you are doing and why would use the poster to, by themselves, learn something about what's going on.  As a second example, you might design a poster that will be "staffed" by a live person (you!) who is expert in the work that's described on the poster.  In this case, many details and much background might be best communicated verbally as you walk somebody through the poster (or in response to specific questions).  I'm sure you can imagine other sorts of poster "settings."  Thinking about the envinronement in which your poster exist plays an important role in choosing what to include/exclude.  So, make sure to take the time...  
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Posters can used in different settings.  For example, you might design a poster to be a stand-alone "self-extracting archive" that stands unattended in the hallway of the biology building.  Somebody who knows nothing about what you are doing and why would use the poster to, by themselves, learn something about what's going on.  As a second example, you might design a poster that will be "staffed" by a live person (you!) who is expert in the work that's described on the poster.  In this case, many details and much background might be best communicated verbally as you walk somebody through the poster (or in response to specific questions).  I'm sure you can imagine other sorts of poster "settings."  Thinking about the environment in which your poster must survive (and thrive) will play an important role in choosing what to include/exclude.  So, make sure to take the time...  
'''Poster Layout'''
'''Poster Layout'''

Revision as of 18:49, 29 April 2005

Poster Goals

Posters can used in different settings. For example, you might design a poster to be a stand-alone "self-extracting archive" that stands unattended in the hallway of the biology building. Somebody who knows nothing about what you are doing and why would use the poster to, by themselves, learn something about what's going on. As a second example, you might design a poster that will be "staffed" by a live person (you!) who is expert in the work that's described on the poster. In this case, many details and much background might be best communicated verbally as you walk somebody through the poster (or in response to specific questions). I'm sure you can imagine other sorts of poster "settings." Thinking about the environment in which your poster must survive (and thrive) will play an important role in choosing what to include/exclude. So, make sure to take the time...

Poster Layout

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