Nowlan:Home

From OpenWetWare

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(New page: Dr. Niamh Nowlan was appointed a lecturer in the Department of Bioengineering in 2011. Dr. Nowlan’s research is in the area of developmental mechanobiology, with particular focus on skel...)
Current revision (07:55, 8 January 2013) (view source)
 
(12 intermediate revisions not shown.)
Line 1: Line 1:
-
Dr. Niamh Nowlan was appointed a lecturer in the Department of Bioengineering in 2011. Dr. Nowlan’s research is in the area of developmental mechanobiology, with particular focus on skeletogenesis; the study of how mechanical forces induced by prenatal movements affect bone and joint formation before birth.
+
{{Nowlan}}
-
Prior to joining Imperial College, Dr. Nowlan held two postdoctoral fellowships in Trinity College Dublin, Ireland and in the Centre for Genomic Research, Barcelona, Spain. In 2009, Dr. Nowlan travelled to the USA as a Fulbright scholar, and spent six months working in Boston University. Dr. Nowlan obtained a PhD in Bioengineering from Trinity College Dublin, Ireland in 2003, and holds a degree in Computer Engineering.
+
== Welcome to the Developmental Biomechanics Lab! ==
 +
 
 +
Why do babies kick? The Developmental Biomechanics Lab is exploring this question from the point of view of how movement in the womb affects formation and development of the bones and joints. Mechanical forces are important for normal function of adult bones and joints, and we are investigating if mechanical forces are also important for prenatal skeletal development. If you are interested in learning more, please check out our Research page and our Publications.
 +
 
 +
We are in the [http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/bioengineering Department of Bioengineering] at [http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/ Imperial College London]. Our research is part of the [http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/bioengineering/research/biomechanics Biomechanics] theme.
 +
<b>

Current revision

Home        People        Research        Publications        Talks        News        Internal        Opportunities        Contact       


Welcome to the Developmental Biomechanics Lab!

Why do babies kick? The Developmental Biomechanics Lab is exploring this question from the point of view of how movement in the womb affects formation and development of the bones and joints. Mechanical forces are important for normal function of adult bones and joints, and we are investigating if mechanical forces are also important for prenatal skeletal development. If you are interested in learning more, please check out our Research page and our Publications.

We are in the Department of Bioengineering at Imperial College London. Our research is part of the Biomechanics theme.

Personal tools