Rich Lab:JoinUs

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Second, be sure you have some sense what you're interested in. If you're considering graduate work, be sure you know what is involved in a MS or a PhD in the sciences. Also read [http://stearnslab.yale.edu/some-modest-advice-graduate-students this article] by Stephen Stearns at Yale on Advice for grad students. I don't agree with everything he says, but I think it's a generally very useful perspective to have in mind.  
Second, be sure you have some sense what you're interested in. If you're considering graduate work, be sure you know what is involved in a MS or a PhD in the sciences. Also read [http://stearnslab.yale.edu/some-modest-advice-graduate-students this article] by Stephen Stearns at Yale on Advice for grad students. I don't agree with everything he says, but I think it's a generally very useful perspective to have in mind.  
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Third, know that it's very uncommon for there to be open project funding for a student - it's like cookies, gobbled up very quickly. i.e., we fill open funded positions fast. SO, chances are good that we don't have funding for you unless you've seen a specific advertisement about it. But, you have the power to get your own funding! Please see our [http://openwetware.org/wiki/Rich_Lab:Funding Funding Opportunities] page, and search the web, to identify opportunities that might be a good fit for you. If you're interested in our group and identified a funding source you may be competitive for, we can talk and if we agree your fit in the lab would be good then I am happy to work with you on a funding application to help make that a reality.  If you're an undergraduate, it's common to do research for course research credit, and often to volunteer for some period before receiving pay. In our lab each undergrad ''always'' receives research units for scientific inquiry done in the lab; whether they get paid or not depends on funding (which again, the undergraduate has the power to obtain independently), previous experience, time with the group, length of commitment, etc.  
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Third, know that it's very uncommon for there to be open project funding for a student - it's like cookies, gobbled up very quickly. i.e., we fill open funded positions fast. SO, chances are good that we don't have funding for you unless you've seen a specific advertisement about it. But, you have the power to get your own funding! Please see our [http://openwetware.org/wiki/Rich_Lab:Funding Funding Opportunities] page, and search the web, to identify opportunities that might be a good fit for you. If you're interested in our group and have identified a funding source you may be competitive for, we can talk and if we agree your fit in the lab would be good then I am happy to work with you on a funding application to help make that a reality.  If you're an undergraduate, it's common to do research for course research credit, and often to volunteer for some period before receiving pay. In our lab each undergrad ''always'' receives research units for scientific inquiry done in the lab; whether they get paid or not depends on funding (which again, the undergraduate has the power to obtain independently), previous experience, time with the group, length of commitment, etc.  
Fourth, if you email me and I don't write back, don't take it personally. Email me again. I don't mean to be rude, there's simply not enough hours in the day, and I definitely want and intend to reply to you even if there's no position open.  
Fourth, if you email me and I don't write back, don't take it personally. Email me again. I don't mean to be rude, there's simply not enough hours in the day, and I definitely want and intend to reply to you even if there's no position open.  

Revision as of 17:12, 6 March 2014

Thanks for your interest in our lab. We work hard and are excited about our science, and are a caring community who look out for each other. Thus FYI we all vet potential applicants.

First, if you're interested in joining us, make sure your CV is in order.

Second, be sure you have some sense what you're interested in. If you're considering graduate work, be sure you know what is involved in a MS or a PhD in the sciences. Also read this article by Stephen Stearns at Yale on Advice for grad students. I don't agree with everything he says, but I think it's a generally very useful perspective to have in mind.

Third, know that it's very uncommon for there to be open project funding for a student - it's like cookies, gobbled up very quickly. i.e., we fill open funded positions fast. SO, chances are good that we don't have funding for you unless you've seen a specific advertisement about it. But, you have the power to get your own funding! Please see our Funding Opportunities page, and search the web, to identify opportunities that might be a good fit for you. If you're interested in our group and have identified a funding source you may be competitive for, we can talk and if we agree your fit in the lab would be good then I am happy to work with you on a funding application to help make that a reality. If you're an undergraduate, it's common to do research for course research credit, and often to volunteer for some period before receiving pay. In our lab each undergrad always receives research units for scientific inquiry done in the lab; whether they get paid or not depends on funding (which again, the undergraduate has the power to obtain independently), previous experience, time with the group, length of commitment, etc.

Fourth, if you email me and I don't write back, don't take it personally. Email me again. I don't mean to be rude, there's simply not enough hours in the day, and I definitely want and intend to reply to you even if there's no position open.

Thanks!

Virginia

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