Smolke

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[[Image:Smolke_side.png|thumb|300px|right|Antiswitch-mediated regulation of gene expression. Antiswitch molecules are in an ‘off’ conformation (back right) when not bound to a small molecule ligand (green) and switch to an ‘on’ conformation upon ligand binding (middle left). In the ‘on’ conformation these molecules will bind to a target transcript (blue) to inhibit gene expression through antisense mechanisms (foreground).]]
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[[Image:Cell fate.jpg|thumb|350px|right|Programming cell fate decisions with synthetic RNA controllers. (Image by Kristine Chang and Stephanie Culler)]]
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<font face="trebuchet ms" size="+1" style="color:#000000">The Smolke Lab is interested in using a combination of interdisciplinary approaches encompassing biomolecular engineering, biochemical engineering, and synthetic biology with a strong foundation in molecular biology, biochemistry, and chemical biology to study complex gene regulatory networks and develop sophisticated gene expression technologies. Our laboratory is part of the [http://cheme.che.caltech.edu/ Chemical Engineering Department] at [http://www.caltech.edu/ California Institute of Technology], although due to the interdisciplinary nature of our research focus we are cross-listed in the [http://www.its.caltech.edu/~biochem/ Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics], [http://www.be.caltech.edu/ Bioengineering], and [http://chemistry.caltech.edu/ Chemistry Departments]. A major focus of the lab is studying the bioactive properties of RNA and engineering RNA, and other bioactive molecules, into modular functional technology platforms for applications in metabolic engineering and circuit design, as well as medical applications focused on the molecular mechanisms of cancer and disease and developing effective therapies and treatments.
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<font face="trebuchet ms" size="+1" style="color:#000000">The Smolke Laboratory is interested in using a combination of interdisciplinary approaches encompassing biomolecular design, synthetic biology, and cellular engineering with a strong foundation in engineering design principles, biochemistry, molecular biology, and chemical biology to study complex gene regulatory networks and develop sophisticated gene expression technologies. Our laboratory is part of the [http://bioengineering.stanford.edu Bioengineering Department] at [http://www.stanford.edu/ Stanford University] in the Schools of Engineering and Medicine. We are also part of the [http://biox.stanford.edu/ BioX Program]. Our research efforts focus on the design of new molecular tools for performing information processing, computation, and control functions in living systems and the application of these tools to programming and probing biological systems. We are applying these technologies to addressing key challenges in cellular therapeutics, targeted molecular therapies, and green biosynthesis strategies.  
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The Smolke Lab will be moving to [http://bioengineering.stanford.edu/faculty/ Stanford] in January 2009.
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<br> [[Smolke:Open Positions|OPEN POSITIONS]]
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Revision as of 13:52, 15 March 2011

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Programming cell fate decisions with synthetic RNA controllers. (Image by Kristine Chang and Stephanie Culler)
Programming cell fate decisions with synthetic RNA controllers. (Image by Kristine Chang and Stephanie Culler)

The Smolke Laboratory is interested in using a combination of interdisciplinary approaches encompassing biomolecular design, synthetic biology, and cellular engineering with a strong foundation in engineering design principles, biochemistry, molecular biology, and chemical biology to study complex gene regulatory networks and develop sophisticated gene expression technologies. Our laboratory is part of the Bioengineering Department at Stanford University in the Schools of Engineering and Medicine. We are also part of the BioX Program. Our research efforts focus on the design of new molecular tools for performing information processing, computation, and control functions in living systems and the application of these tools to programming and probing biological systems. We are applying these technologies to addressing key challenges in cellular therapeutics, targeted molecular therapies, and green biosynthesis strategies.



OPEN POSITIONS
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