Talk:CH391L/S12/MetabolicEngineering

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Things that would be good to address: 1) toxicity of intermediates and products in metabolic engineering, their effect on the host organisms, and the ways that this is dealt with. 2) What is the efficiency of the production of biofuels? Mass in to mass out? 3) what are the different feed stocks one uses? pros and cons of each?*'''[[User:Brian Renda|Brian Renda]] 17:03, 13 February 2012 (EST)''':
Things that would be good to address: 1) toxicity of intermediates and products in metabolic engineering, their effect on the host organisms, and the ways that this is dealt with. 2) What is the efficiency of the production of biofuels? Mass in to mass out? 3) what are the different feed stocks one uses? pros and cons of each?*'''[[User:Brian Renda|Brian Renda]] 17:03, 13 February 2012 (EST)''':
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*'''[[User:Ben Slater|Ben Slater]] 23:33, 13 February 2012 (EST)''': The University of Washington, last year's iGEM winner, had a [http://2011.igem.org/Team:Washington/Alkanes/Background project] that seems to fit in with biofuels/metabolic engineering ([http://2011.igem.org/Team:Washington/Alkanes/Results results]). I'd also recommend checking out the other half of their project, the [http://2011.igem.org/Team:Washington/Celiacs/Background gluten destruction component], just because it's cool.

Revision as of 00:33, 14 February 2012

One interesting strategy for optimizing flux through a pathway is the design of protein scaffolds which spatially recruit components of a metabolic pathway. This "increases the effective concentration of each component of a pathway of interest", a useful property to increase flux without necessarily increasing expression of each component. Gabe Wu, a grad student in my year, is second author on this one. [1, 2] *Michael Hammerling 11:26, 13 February 2012 (EST):


Things that would be good to address: 1) toxicity of intermediates and products in metabolic engineering, their effect on the host organisms, and the ways that this is dealt with. 2) What is the efficiency of the production of biofuels? Mass in to mass out? 3) what are the different feed stocks one uses? pros and cons of each?*Brian Renda 17:03, 13 February 2012 (EST):

  • Ben Slater 23:33, 13 February 2012 (EST): The University of Washington, last year's iGEM winner, had a project that seems to fit in with biofuels/metabolic engineering (results). I'd also recommend checking out the other half of their project, the gluten destruction component, just because it's cool.
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