User:Akohli

From OpenWetWare

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(Last Name)
Line 2: Line 2:
===Last Name===
===Last Name===
-
Poopy
+
Kohli
===First Name===
===First Name===

Revision as of 09:52, 12 June 2007

Contents

20.109 Spring 2007

Last Name

Kohli

First Name

Aditya


Course/Minor

Course 20, minor in Economics

Year of Graduation

2009

Telephone #

818-687-5912

Email

akohli at mit dot edu

Have you taken

7.05/5.07 (Biochemistry) currently taking
7.06 (Cell Biology) no
7.02 (General Biology Lab) no
5.310 (General Chemistry Lab) no

Do you have any experience culturing cells (mammalian, yeast or microbial)?
No

Do you have any experience in molecular biology (electrophoresis, PCR, etc)?
No

Please briefly describe any previous laboratory experience

UROP in Han Lab sorting nanowires.

Anything else you would like us to know?

Optional: As mentioned in lecture on 02.06.07, we would like you to consider how, as a biological engineer you might test the superstition "Spit on a bat before using it for the 1st time to make it lucky." fill in your answer here

The first thing I would do would be to define "lucky." Does "lucky" mean that I hit x number of home runs or does it mean that I never strike out? Once I have this criteria, I can sort some sample of bats based on luckiness. Moreover, we know that if you spit on some random object it does not become lucky; luckiness from spit is specific to bats. Thus, the lucky component must be some mix of an element of the bat and an element of saliva. Thus I could test the composition of the lucky bats and unlucky bats and see the difference. Once I pinpoint the components necessary to mix together to make a lucky bat, I can check if they are inherent in saliva. If they are, I have proved that saliva makes bats lucky. If not, then I have negated that hypothesis.

Personal tools