User:Austin G. Meyer

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(Summary)
(Summary)
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I am also a joint member in the labs of Drs. [http://wilke.openwetware.org/ Claus Wilke] and [http://barricklab.org Jeff Barrick] at the University of Texas at Austin.
I am also a joint member in the labs of Drs. [http://wilke.openwetware.org/ Claus Wilke] and [http://barricklab.org Jeff Barrick] at the University of Texas at Austin.
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Visit my research website [http://meyerlab.org here].
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Visit my research website [http://www.meyerlab.org here].
My website is generally kept more up to date and in depth on my work.
My website is generally kept more up to date and in depth on my work.

Revision as of 16:10, 11 February 2013

Contents

Contact Info

Austin G. Meyer (In Taos, NM)
Austin G. Meyer (In Taos, NM)

Summary

I am currently attending medical school at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.

I am also a joint member in the labs of Drs. Claus Wilke and Jeff Barrick at the University of Texas at Austin.

Visit my research website here.

My website is generally kept more up to date and in depth on my work.

Education

  • In Progress (2016), MD, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
  • In Progress (2014), PhD Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin
  • 2010, MS Structural Biology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
  • 2008, BS Physics, Texas Tech University
  • 2008, BA Philosophy, Texas Tech University

Research interests

  1. Quantitative Biology - In particular modeling biological phenomena and making predictions from simulations.
  2. Experimental Molecular Biology and Molecular Evolution - Exploiting natural processes to technological ends.
  3. Structural Biology and Biophysics
  4. Quantitative and Data Science - At the intersection of traditional fields like statistics and computer science. I think this will be the next revolution in science and technology. We are already seeing steps in this direction with obvious examples coming from the Large Hadron Collider and the Genomics revolution, and less obvious, but potentially more important data troves coming from social networks and relatively passive internet browsing.
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