User:DeviNcAmenares

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===Contact Info===
===Contact Info===
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Devin Camenares  
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Devin Camenares<br>
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Biotech Center, Cook College, Rutgers University
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Biotech Center, Cook College, Rutgers University<br>
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18474 CPO Way
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18474 CPO Way<br>
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New Brunswick, NJ, 08901
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New Brunswick, NJ, 08901<br>
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devinjc@eden.rutgers.edu
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devinjc@eden.rutgers.edu<br>
[[Leustek Laboratory]] at Rutgers University.
[[Leustek Laboratory]] at Rutgers University.
===Education===
===Education===
* Graduation Expected January 2007 with a BS in Biotechnology
* Graduation Expected January 2007 with a BS in Biotechnology
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Fill in your educational background.
 
===Research Interests===
===Research Interests===
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Synthetic Biology
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Synthetic Biology<br>
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More Synthetic Biology
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More Synthetic Biology<br>
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Biotechnology
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Biotechnology<br>
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Molecular Biology
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Molecular Biology<br>
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Neuroscience
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Neuroscience<br>
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Systems Biology
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Systems Biology<br>
For the past three years, I have been working in the laboratory of Dr. Thomas Leustek, at Rutgers University. The Focus of the Leustek Group is on amino acid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Projects that I have worked on include functional genomics of histidine biosynthesis, functional genomics of proline biosynthesis, and characterization of microbial diaminopimelate aminotransferases (enzymology of lysine biosynthesis).
For the past three years, I have been working in the laboratory of Dr. Thomas Leustek, at Rutgers University. The Focus of the Leustek Group is on amino acid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Projects that I have worked on include functional genomics of histidine biosynthesis, functional genomics of proline biosynthesis, and characterization of microbial diaminopimelate aminotransferases (enzymology of lysine biosynthesis).
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===Publications===
===Publications===
Several publications pending
Several publications pending
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===Designer Genes===
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I am currently the president of the Rutgers Biotechnology Club, Designer Genes. We can be found on the web at http://aesop.rutgers.edu/~dgenes. We try to cultivate interest in biotechnology, and I am begining efforts to bring a greater awareness of synthetic biology to the Rutgers community as well.
===Miscellaneous===
===Miscellaneous===

Current revision

Contents

Contact Info

Devin Camenares
Biotech Center, Cook College, Rutgers University
18474 CPO Way
New Brunswick, NJ, 08901
devinjc@eden.rutgers.edu
Leustek Laboratory at Rutgers University.

Education

  • Graduation Expected January 2007 with a BS in Biotechnology

Research Interests

Synthetic Biology
More Synthetic Biology
Biotechnology
Molecular Biology
Neuroscience
Systems Biology

For the past three years, I have been working in the laboratory of Dr. Thomas Leustek, at Rutgers University. The Focus of the Leustek Group is on amino acid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Projects that I have worked on include functional genomics of histidine biosynthesis, functional genomics of proline biosynthesis, and characterization of microbial diaminopimelate aminotransferases (enzymology of lysine biosynthesis).

Publications

Several publications pending

Designer Genes

I am currently the president of the Rutgers Biotechnology Club, Designer Genes. We can be found on the web at http://aesop.rutgers.edu/~dgenes. We try to cultivate interest in biotechnology, and I am begining efforts to bring a greater awareness of synthetic biology to the Rutgers community as well.

Miscellaneous

This information is a temporary place holder, until I find the time to exercise my knowledge of HTML and create the most awesome page on the web.

I found one of my experiences working on the lysine biosynthesis project to be particularly interesting; The graduate student I was working with had cloned one of the orthologs we were studying out of frame. Without realising this, he induced expression and was able to see activity. Presumably this is due to a low rate (10^-5 if I am not mistaken) of translational frameshift error. However, after recreating the construct so that the gene was in-frame, no activity was dectectable and all of the protein appeared to end up in an inclusion body. In my search of the literature, I have not found any other examples of constructing a gene for heterologous expression out of frame as a technique to get soluble protein. I wonder how useful it might be.

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