User:Sarah A. Wilson

From OpenWetWare

Revision as of 11:22, 21 September 2011 by Sarah A. Wilson (Talk | contribs)
Jump to: navigation, search

Contents

Contact Info

Sarah A. Wilson
Sarah A. Wilson
  • Sarah A. Wilson
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • 159 Goessmann Laboratory
  • 686 N. Pleasant Street
  • Amherst, Ma 01003
  • Email me through OpenWetWare

I am currently a PhD student in the Chemical Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. My work in the Roberts Lab is to use metabolic engineering to increase paclitaxel accumulation in Taxus suspension cultures.

Education

  • Expected 2014, PhD in Chemical Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • 2012, Graduate Certificate in Cellular Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • 2009, BS in Chemical Engineering at Rowan University

Research interests

Publications

Wilson, S.A. and Roberts, S.C. (2011) Recent advances towards development and commercialization of plant cell culture processes for synthesis of biomolecules. Plant Biotechnology Journal.

Undergraduate Researchers

Nick Cadirov

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Department of Chemical Engineering
  • Nick has worked in the lab since the beginning of his junior year. As a senior, he is currently completing his honors thesis in the Roberts lab. His project is to optimize a protocol for the reculturing of Taxus protoplasts.

Nicole Raia
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Department of Chemical Engineering
  • Nicole has worked in the lab since the beginning of her junior year. As a senior, she is currently completing her honors thesis in the Roberts lab. Her project is to develop a selection protocol for our Taxus cell lines after an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.



Kristen Garcia

  • University of New Mexico
  • Department of Chemical Engineering
  • Kristen came to UMass as an Institute for Cellular Engineering sponsored REU student. Her project was to develop a protocol for the purification and reculturing of protoplasts isolated from an aggregated Taxus culture.

Meghan Combs
  • Montana State University
  • Department of Chemical Engineering
  • Meghan came to UMass as an Institute for Cellular Engineering sponsored REU student. Her project was to investigate the effect of cell processing techniques on the viability and growth of our Taxus suspension cultures.





Personal tools