BME100 f2015:Group4 1030aml3

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Lab Write-Up 1 | Lab Write-Up 2 | Lab Write-Up 3
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Contents

OUR TEAM

Name: Christa Deckman
Name: Christa Deckman
Name: Gabrielle Mills
Name: Gabrielle Mills
Name: Ngan Nguyen
Name: Ngan Nguyen
Name: Dylan Bonch
Name: Dylan Bonch
Name: Evan Higgs
Name: Evan Higgs
Name: Niel Restogi
Name: Niel Restogi

LAB 3A: "Device Validation"

Descriptive Statistics

Temperature

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Heart Rate

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The units for standard deviation, mean, and standard error are degrees Fahrenheit for temperature and bpm for heat rate.

A T-test was used since only two variables existed in each experiment.

Results

Given that the Pearson’s correlation coefficient, r, for the relationship between pulse ox and Spree headband heart rate measurements is .82339451, there is a relatively linear relationship between the measurements of the two devices. Given that the Pearson’s correlation coefficient, r, for the relationship between oral thermometer and Spree headband temperature measurement is 0.1674259, there is a weak linear relationship between the measurements of the two devices. Overall, the Spree headband was reliable for measuring heart rate in bpm, given that the Pearson’s r coefficient is relatively close to 1.0. On the other hand, this device is unreliable for measuring the temperature in Fahrenheit, given that the r coefficient is fairly close to 0.0.



Analysis

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Since the P-value is approximately zero, we are more than 99% confident that there is a significant difference between the temperature measurements of the Spree Headband and oral thermometer. Therefore, there is sufficient evidence to conclude that there is a significant difference in temperature measurement due to the device used. Since the P-value is greater than 0.05, we are 70.6% confident that there is a significant difference between the heart rate measurements of the Spree Headband and pulse ox. Therefore, there is no sufficient evidence to conclude that there is a significant difference in the heart rate measurements due to the device used.




Summary/Discussion

The design flaws include the device’s continued inability to stay connected to the phone app via bluetooth, the temperature is measured in levels rather than precise temperature readings, the device keeps slipping off the user due to sweat, and there was a large variance in heart rate when the conditions were similar and the user was immobile. In addition to these things, the Spree was obvious in appearance and caused chafing on the forehead.

With that being said, Spree lacks the accuracy of calculating caloric data. The caloric measurement is based solely on height and weight. It doesn’t take account the user’s fat percentage, muscle mass, resting heart rate, and pre-existing health conditions of the user such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol. For optimal results, Spree should record the user’s fat percentage and muscle mass to ideally calculate the number of calories burned. Also, Spree should be able to calculate the user’s resting heart rate to reveal the optimal target heart rate for the user during aerobic activities. In the end, Spree is acceptable for beginner users that want a kickstart in the health and fitness lifestyle. However, overall, Spree is not efficient for long-term fitness users.




LAB 3B: Device Development and Marketing

Target Population and Need



Device Design



Inferential Statistics



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