BME100 f2016:Group10 W8AM L3

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Contents

OUR TEAM

Name: Eli Ozaki
Name: Eli Ozaki
Name: Your name
Name: Your name
Name: Nicholas Guzek
Name: Nicholas Guzek
Name: Alexandra Dalbec
Name: Alexandra Dalbec
Name: Your name
Name: Your name
Name: Your name
Name: Your name

LAB 3 WRITE-UP

Descriptive Stats and Graph

Average of heart rate measurements by pulse ox (gold standard) = 98.08976898

Average of heart rate measurements by Spree = 98.94078947

Standard deviation of heart rate measurements by pulse ox (gold standard) = 23.03054395

Standard deviation of heart rate measurement by Spree = 24.83748725

Correlation coefficient between pulse ox (gold standard) and Spree = 0.690806489

Average of body temperature measurements by oral thermometer (gold standard) = 96.65269939

Average of body temperature measurements by Spree = 95.5308642

Standard deviation of body temperature measurements by oral thermometer (gold standard) = 1.918462545

Standard deviation of body temperature measurement by Spree = 0.870378299

Correlation coefficient between oral thermometer (gold standard) and Spree = 0.192798089



Inferential Stats

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ik=16015cda89&view=att&th=157939ca0035bdaa&attid=0.1&disp=safe&realattid=f_itwk32jc0&zw



Design Flaws and Recommendations

Our product Spree, falls short of giving an accurate measurement of temperature. The correlation coefficient between oral thermometer (gold standard) and Spree = 0.192798089. Proving that the devices temperature measuring technologies fall short of standard. However Spree satisfies the standard to measure the users heart rate. The correlation coefficient between pulse ox (gold standard) and Spree = 0.690806489. Any correlation coefficient above .4 is a good correlation between the gold standard device and Spree.





Experimental Design of Own Device

To test our device, we would test our non-invasive patches against an insulin pump. We would be measuring the blood glucose levels of people using the insulin pump and our patches. People without diabetes normally have a blood glucose level from 70-99 mg/dl, (milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood,) before meals and under 140 mg/dl 1-2 hours after meals. A person with diabetes normally has a blood glucose level of 80-130 mg/dl before meals and under 180 mg/dl 1-2 hours after meals. Since we know that insulin pumps work, we would test to see what kind of results the insulin pump gives and what kind of blood glucose levels the patients using the insulin pump have, and compare that to the blood glucose levels of people using our patches, to see if our patches were giving similar results and are working or if they are giving a completely different result and are not working. If the patches are working, there would be a high correlation coefficient between the insulin pump and the patches that we would be able to see. We would also find the standard deviation for the insulin pump and compare that to the standard deviation of the patches. If the patches have both a high correlation coefficient and a similar standard deviation compared to that of the insulin pump, we would be able to tell that the patches are effective or not. For our experiment, we would gather 200 people and have 100 people using the insulin pump and the other 100 people would be using the patches. The people we would be looking for to be in our experiment would be males and females between the ages of 18 and 30 years old that have type 1 diabetes.

Works Cited

Spero, David. "What Is a Normal Blood Sugar Level? - Diabetes Self-Management." Diabetes SelfManagement. Diabetes Self-Management, 13 Jan. 2016. Web. 28 Sept. 2016.

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