NRP-UEA-Norwich iGEM :Alumni pages

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UEA iGEM Team 2011: UEA-JIC_Norwich

To see the team's iGEM wiki, go to://http://2011.igem.org/Team:UEA-JIC_Norwich

For this team, some Instructors and Advisors were based at the School of Biological Sciences at the University of East Anglia in Norwich (BIO) and some were based at the John Innes Centre in Norwich (JIC).

Instructors

  • Richard Bowater (BIO)
  • Matt Hutchings (BIO)
  • Paul O'Maille (JIC)
  • Richard Morris (JIC)
  • Colwyn Thomas (BIO)
  • Kay Yeoman (BIO)

Student Members

  • Jarama Clucas
  • Mario de Piano
  • Gurdeep Dosanjh
  • Ben Hardy
  • Kimberley Hirst-Jones
  • Ben Jevans
  • Abigail Savoy
  • Alistair Walsham
  • Mark Wright

Advisors

  • Steven Garrett (JIC)
  • Richard Kelwick (BIO)


UEA iGEM Team 2012: NRP-UEA-Norwich

To see the team's iGEM wiki, go to://http://2012.igem.org/Team:NRP-UEA-Norwich

Project overview

Sensory BioBrick systems have been a large constituent of previous iGEM projects in which teams have combined impressive amounts of logic with limitless creativity in order to produce synthetically engineered organisms with the ability to detect the presence of specific substrates; this was achieved by combining various promoters and reporters to produce novel gene systems of great breadth and depth.

We too have taken a sensory approach to our project and have produced systems involved in the sensation of nitric oxide (NO). Originally we set out to develop a bacterial and mammalian hybrid NO-sensing promoter (which we have achieved); we then looked into ways of quantifying the levels of highly reactive and difficult to measure NO within a system, leading to us producing a novel gene regulation system known as the comparator circuit. Throughout the project we went on to look at theoretical alternative approaches to the gene systems we have produced.

For this team, all Instructors and Advisors were based at the School of Biological Sciences at the University of East Anglia in Norwich (BIO).

Instructors

  • Richard Bowater (BIO)
  • Matt Hutchings (BIO)
  • Colwyn Thomas (BIO)
  • Kay Yeoman (BIO)

Student Members

  • Pascoe J Harvey
  • Rachel Dobson
  • Joy Edwards-Hicks
  • Russell Gritton
  • Lukas Harnisch
  • Rebecca Lo
  • Khadija Ouadi

Advisors

  • Richard Kelwick (BIO)
  • Amy Congdon (Mentor for art & film)


UEA iGEM Team 2013: NRP-UEA-Norwich

To see the team's iGEM wiki, go to://http://2013.igem.org/Team:NRP-UEA-Norwich

Project overview

Developing Biosensors to Identify Antimycin-Producing Actinomycetes

Antimycins, antifungal compounds primarily produced by Streptomyces (a sub-set of actinomycetes), function by inhibiting the final stage of the electron transport chain. Our aim was to develop Biosensors to aid identification of novel antimycin-producing actinomycetes.

Homologues of the AntA sigma factor, the key regulatory protein in antimycin biosynthesis, are present in all 14 known biosynthetic gene clusters. Due to this property, Biosensors have been designed with the AntA-regulated promoter (antGp) controlling the expression of three promoters: neomycin resistance gene, RFP (Red Fluorescent Protein) and GUS (providing beta-glucoronidase activity).

The Biosensors were produced, trialled and optimised where possible after sub-cloning into two actinomycete-specific integrative plasmids, pMS82 and pAU3-45. Worldwide soil and sediment samples were collected to produce a library of actinomycete strains, which were screened using our Biosensors, with the ultimate goal being to assess bacterial strains for actinomycin production.

For this team, all Instructors and Advisors were based at the School of Biological Sciences at the University of East Anglia in Norwich (BIO).

Instructors

Student Members

  • Matt Batchelor
  • Michael Brown
  • Lucy Clark
  • Shaima'a Hamarsheh
  • Rebecca Spanner
  • Divya Thankachan
  • Beth Williams

Advisors

  • John T. Munnoch (BIO)


UEA iGEM Team 2014: NRP-UEA-Norwich

To see the team's iGEM wiki, go to://http://2014.igem.org/Team:NRP-UEA-Norwich

Project overview

The Green Canary

Food security is becoming an ever prominent global issue; by 2050 food production needs to increase by 70% to feed the 9 billion people that will inhabit our planet. However, dedicating new land to farming may not be viable and as a global society we will have to utilise the land available. In 2012 OECD reported that 40% of global crop yields are lost to pests and diseases, and the NRP-UEA 2014 iGEM project applied synthetic biology approaches with an aim to potentially reduce the vast void of crops that are inedible due to pathogen infection. The combined human practices and ethics research of the team explored the ethical responsibilities of scientists to provide food security for an increasing population and to allow members of the public to choose the ways in which their food is produced.

The aim of the project was to produce diagnostic sentinel plants that will rapidly diagnose the presence of specific selected plant pathogens. The sentinels will exhibit a clear chromoprotein expression signal within 24 hours of pathogen infection. The signal could be observed by the human eye or interpreted by a remote sensing system capable of alerting the grower who can take necessary action, potentially by appropriate agrochemical application before the disease progresses to symptomatic pathogenesis in the crop.

The team were able to express circuits in plants that were switched on or up-regulated in response to signals of pathogen invasion. In addition they were able to demonstrate promoters that respond to general stress signals could be used even when the sentinel was unable to diagnose the specific pathogen. Finally, the team were able to demonstrate very tightly regulated expression in response to a particular pathogens. The team concluded that this project is viable and that further steps would be to use the pathogen-specific promoters to induce a second signal to diagnose the specific pathogen. If the circuits were able to function in the transient, model systems, stably transformed plants would be prepared that could be tested with the actual pathogens in the laboratory and, if successful and permits were granted, in field conditions.

For this team, the Instructors and Advisors were based at various institutes across the Norwich Research Park: BIO = School of Biological Sciences at the University of East Anglia; JIC = John Innes Centre; MED = Norwich Medical School; TSL = The Sainsbury Laboratory.


Instructors

  • Richard Bowater (BIO)
  • Mark Banfield (JIC)
  • Nicola Patron (TSL)
  • Colwyn Thomas (BIO)

Student Members

  • Jack Day
  • Cara Deal
  • Jessica Gray
  • Alistair Middlemiss
  • Steven Monsey
  • Mischa Spiegel

Advisors

  • Laura Bowater (MED)
  • Anna Smajdor (MED)
  • Tom Shakespeare (MED)
  • Mark Wilkinson (MED)
  • Kay Yeoman (BIO)


UEA iGEM Team 2015: NRP-UEA-Norwich

To see the team's iGEM wiki, go to://http://2015.igem.org/Team:NRP-UEA-Norwich

Project overview

House of Carbs

Colon cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in England and Wales, with 30,000 new cases diagnosed every year and a registered cause of death in half that number.

Recent studies have suggested that high dietary intake of resistant starch may reduce colon cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. Resistant starches escape digestion in the small intestine and are fermented by microbiota in the colon. A small proportion of these colonic bacteria produce short chain fatty acids such as butyrate, which can activate apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

Our project focused on increasing the amount of butyrate in the colon.


Instructors

Instructors were based at various institutes across the Norwich Research Park: BIO = School of Biological Sciences at the University of East Anglia; JIC = John Innes Centre; TSL = The Sainsbury Laboratory.

Student Members

  • Leda Coelewij
  • Farhan Mitha
  • Mark Riemer-Elms
  • Kieran Rustage
  • Josh Thody
  • Flavia Valeo

Advisors

  • Sibyl Batey (JIC)
  • Pilar Moreno (TSL)
  • Eleftheria Trampari (JIC)


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