IGEM:IMPERIAL/2009

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Killswitch guys, I think perhaps looking into recombinases as opposed to restriction enzymes would be useful as they won't act on host DNA. [http://aem.asm.org/cgi/content/full/72/4/2520 Xer and Dif sites] will recombine with themselves in presence of the required enzyme, excising any genes between them - you could flank genes with them, then express the enzyme to chop your construct up. Sites are required to be within ≈5kb of each other, I think, so random ones on host DNA shouldn't be affected. It might take a while to work so look into the time; could be useful as a fallback, anyway.
Killswitch guys, I think perhaps looking into recombinases as opposed to restriction enzymes would be useful as they won't act on host DNA. [http://aem.asm.org/cgi/content/full/72/4/2520 Xer and Dif sites] will recombine with themselves in presence of the required enzyme, excising any genes between them - you could flank genes with them, then express the enzyme to chop your construct up. Sites are required to be within ≈5kb of each other, I think, so random ones on host DNA shouldn't be affected. It might take a while to work so look into the time; could be useful as a fallback, anyway.
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Biobrick images you can use if you need (advisors like named/labelled circuit diagrams!): [[Image:P.png]] [[Image:R.png]] [[Image:G.png]] [[Image:T.png]]
~ [[User:Tom Adie|Tom Adie]] 15:44, 20 July 2009 (EDT)
~ [[User:Tom Adie|Tom Adie]] 15:44, 20 July 2009 (EDT)

Revision as of 16:24, 20 July 2009

iGEM 2009 - Imperial College London Team

Work in progress ...

Contents

ToDo & Deadlines

Useful Links


Wiki Updates


Synthetic Biology @ Imperial

iGEM resources

Advisor Contributions

Schumann lab from Uni. Beyreuth, DE have done some interesting work on using spores to direct antigens to the gut - to act as vaccines. Sporulation guys might also be interested in this paper, describing the B. sub coat protein (and how it's hilariously complex but not all required). Oh, and subtilis spores will germinate in the gut (probably), justifying using the killswitch!

Killswitch guys, I think perhaps looking into recombinases as opposed to restriction enzymes would be useful as they won't act on host DNA. Xer and Dif sites will recombine with themselves in presence of the required enzyme, excising any genes between them - you could flank genes with them, then express the enzyme to chop your construct up. Sites are required to be within ≈5kb of each other, I think, so random ones on host DNA shouldn't be affected. It might take a while to work so look into the time; could be useful as a fallback, anyway.

Biobrick images you can use if you need (advisors like named/labelled circuit diagrams!): Image:P.png Image:R.png Image:G.png Image:T.png

~ Tom Adie 15:44, 20 July 2009 (EDT)

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