OpenWetWare:Software/Server/Apache/Log Rotation

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Log Rotation

On even a moderately busy server, the quantity of information stored in the log files is very large. The access log file typically grows 1 MB or more per 10,000 requests. It will consequently be necessary to periodically rotate the log files by moving or deleting the existing logs. This cannot be done while the server is running, because Apache will continue writing to the old log file as long as it holds the file open. Instead, the server must be restarted after the log files are moved or deleted so that it will open new log files.

By using a graceful restart, the server can be instructed to open new log files without losing any existing or pending connections from clients. However, in order to accomplish this, the server must continue to write to the old log files while it finishes serving old requests. It is therefore necessary to wait for some time after the restart before doing any processing on the log files. A typical scenario that simply rotates the logs and compresses the old logs to save space is:

  • mv access_log access_log.old
  • mv error_log error_log.old
  • apachectl graceful
  • sleep 600
  • gzip access_log.old error_log.old

Another way to perform log rotation is using piped logs as discussed in the next section.

Piped Logs

Apache httpd is capable of writing error and access log files through a pipe to another process, rather than directly to a file. This capability dramatically increases the flexibility of logging, without adding code to the main server. In order to write logs to a pipe, simply replace the filename with the pipe character "|", followed by the name of the executable which should accept log entries on its standard input. Apache will start the piped-log process when the server starts, and will restart it if it crashes while the server is running. (This last feature is why we can refer to this technique as "reliable piped logging".)

Piped log processes are spawned by the parent Apache httpd process, and inherit the userid of that process. This means that piped log programs usually run as root. It is therefore very important to keep the programs simple and secure.

One important use of piped logs is to allow log rotation without having to restart the server. The Apache HTTP Server includes a simple program called rotatelogs for this purpose. For example, to rotate the logs every 24 hours, you can use:

  • CustomLog "|/usr/local/apache/bin/rotatelogs /var/log/access_log 86400" common

A similar, but much more flexible log rotation program called cronolog is available at an external site.

As with conditional logging, piped logs are a very powerful tool, but they should not be used where a simpler solution like off-line post-processing is available. Virtual Hosts

When running a server with many virtual hosts, there are several options for dealing with log files. First, it is possible to use logs exactly as in a single-host server. Simply by placing the logging directives outside the <VirtualHost> sections in the main server context, it is possible to log all requests in the same access log and error log. This technique does not allow for easy collection of statistics on individual virtual hosts.

If CustomLog or ErrorLog directives are placed inside a <VirtualHost> section, all requests or errors for that virtual host will be logged only to the specified file. Any virtual host which does not have logging directives will still have its requests sent to the main server logs. This technique is very useful for a small number of virtual hosts, but if the number of hosts is very large, it can be complicated to manage. In addition, it can often create problems with insufficient file descriptors.

For the access log, there is a very good compromise. By adding information on the virtual host to the log format string, it is possible to log all hosts to the same log, and later split the log into individual files. For example, consider the following directives.

  • LogFormat "%v %l %u %t \"%r\" %>s %b" comonvhost
  • CustomLog logs/access_log comonvhost

The %v is used to log the name of the virtual host that is serving the request. Then a program like split-logfile can be used to post-process the access log in order to split it into one file per virtual host.

Unfortunately, no similar technique is available for the error log, so you must choose between mixing all virtual hosts in the same error log and using one error log per virtual host.

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